Skip to main content

About your Search

20121123
20121123
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
such a thing as a fiscal cliff like you have in the u.s. the old budget simply takes over up a new budget has been agreed on. so there is no financing disaster in the middle of it. the curious crux to this is if this old budget takes over because of the in-build qui sooif inflation factor in there, it's actually than the new budget they're debating right now, so all the countries pushing for the cut and even putting the threat on the veto on the table, they will actually chief the opposite. we'll keep on spending more even then with a sort of slide budget increase that the eu commission put on the table. and as to where the negotiations stand, i think at the moment the budget talks, pardon to be cynical, but political posturing on the various side than the actual effects in there. because if you look at the mound that the various countries put up into the budget, i think like 9 billion and that is already one of the biggest, we just save banks and sovereigns for hundreds of billions of bailout funds. so in terms of the actual money, this is absolute small cheese. >> absolutely is. silvia, for
see things that are happening not only in the u.s. but on a global basis. it would lead me to believe that the market could be up 10% or more next year. i would -- >> what are you seeing when you say you are looking around the world that makes you believe we'll go higher? >> i see several things. i see emerging markets have slurmd in the second half of the year. i think those are improving, specifically in china. i see the eurozone committed to economic stimulus through their monetary system in the ecb. i think that's very positive for that market. and in the u.s. here, i see employment getting better. i see clarity on the fiscal cliff next year and i see the housing market getting better around better and i think that's a positive. >> rick santelli, it wasn't just stocks rallying today. here in the u.s., europe had its best week of the year this week. the euro is at a three-week high. gold was very strong today. what's the market telling us right now? >> i think the market's telling us that there's a lot of bargain hunting and a lot of optimism towards europe. that made sense. i thin
. >> but the question is what your long-term outlook is. if you're betting against u.s. growth, betting against -- or betting there will be a huge issues in the coming years on these -- on the deficit issue, you may want to keep it off the table. >>> there's a third area there. i don't talk to anybody, steve or our guest, who doesn't think the u.s. can easily ramp up growth. the real discussion i don't think is the true u.s. economy. i thinkist the moguling being throw in front of it, our self-inflected issues, you know, last time around we sequestration. are we going to have sequestration 2? of course we'll put a band-aid, but we need leverage to have reform predicated to surrender on the band-aid. >>> we've got to go, guys. i've got to go with this. we've got to move on. this is the last hour of trading, so we've got to move here. thank you for your thoughts today. steve, thank you, you're voting on a committee of politicians. i find hope in that somehow. >> yeah. you're in the hopeful camp. >> hoping at the last moment they will do the right thing. >> was that a pig that just flew by? the ma
us a lot about the state of the consumer and the u.s. economy today. so we're turning to one of the most seasoned and respected voices on wall street for help. we have dana telsey. she is our guest host for the next three hours. andrew, i'll send it over to you. >> we begin with a visit to toyland and here is toys r us. it opened its doors at 8:00 last night. and we have toys r us ceo joining us right now from the company's flagship store in times square. good morning. >> good morning. >> so i read a report you you had a big line. what's it been like all evening? >> it's been great. we did have a big line. we're at 44th and broadway.line went all the the way to 45th street and then down 45th all the way to 6th avenue. it was huge. people came in in a real celebratory mood. people ate ice cream, relaxed with their kids. i've never seen a black friday like this before, but 8:00 hour worked really well for families. >> let's talk about sales. how did it go overnight? >> we're just starting. this is 5:00 a.m. on black friday morning. we're really just starting. we have about a b.
europe and still a lot of opportunity in the u.s. growing tj max and marshall's and home goods in some smaller markets that they hadn't originally thought they could go into. definitely still think there's room there. >> jennifer, you cover saks as well. do the shorts have something to the story? do they know something that maybe we don't? >> saks did see a slowdown. part of it was related to superstorm sandy. a little over 20% of their business is done in the new york store. i would say 40% of sales are in the northeast. they have been impacted by that. also, you know, i think that maybe we're seeing a little bit of a pause maybe at that high end. maybe kind of more the aspirational customer at the high end. so i think that they're seeing a bit of a slowdown feeling a little bit more than maybe some of their peers that have moderately priced items. >> thank you for joining us. we appreciate it. >>> walmart facing union organized protests at some locations across the country this black friday. among the protesters, some employees walking off the job. hampton pearson is at capital plaza
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5